What do you think of the durability of the Scout Sixty?

Discussion in 'Indian Scout Sixty' started by Poe Snow, Aug 27, 2018.

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  1. Poe Snow

    Poe Snow New Member

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    I'm looking for a motorcycle to bike and am quite interested in Sixty, or in the Bobber.

    However I got a bit worried after watching this video on youtube:


    I would really like to get your experience,especially if you've had the bike for a couple of year and with a good thousand miles on it, and if your motorcycles are holding up good with time, no rusting, electrical issues, etc..

    Safe rides.
     
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  2. Alpal

    Alpal Gold Member
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    Yeah, I've seen this video and he may or may not have a legitamit claim of some sort but let me put it this way,........you buy a cause of apples,.....as you get t,the second layer you find a bad apple,.......do you throw out the whole case of apples?
    Regards,
    Alpal
     
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  3. Poe Snow

    Poe Snow New Member

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    Yeah I get your point . I've read many of your posts and you seem to be having a good experience with the Sixty, from my understanding you haven't come up with any bad experience with the bike or Indian CS.
    Also the model he is referring to isn't the Sixty, so whatever issues he and other people who commented on his video stating they had similar experiences may not apply at all to the Scout, the Sixty or the Bobber.
    That being said, I'm really just looking for some feedback because it is quite an investment (compared to other brands) and I'd like to have more information from people who've owned the bike for a couple of years and have a bunch of thousand miles on (I think you've had yours for quite a while now).
    I'm not even gonna ride the bike all year long, since I'm away from my hometown on work for around 3 months in a row and then I have a full month off work (commuting contracts away from my country - Portugal, Europe), although I'll ride it in almost every season for a while. Just worries me the thought of coming home for a good fun and finding the bike developed some issues on the break.
    Anyway how do you rank this bike for touring Alpal. What's the biggest road trip you've done on it and what were the ups and downs?
     
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  4. Poe Snow

    Poe Snow New Member

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    Great to hear that man, especially with you living in Miami - quite humid environment I guess (here in my hometown it gets quite humid as well).

    In is defense he does state in an updated video that the rust started with regular rain only (way before snow kicked in).

    Have you toured quite a bit on the Sixty? How do you find it comfort wise?


    Safe rides
     
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  5. Da Nurse

    Da Nurse Well-Known Member

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    2016 RM over 15,000 miles, not 1 problem yet. (knocking on wood).;)
     
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  6. Poe Snow

    Poe Snow New Member

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    Good to hear that. I'm booking a test drive next week or after in a dealer near my hometown, just sent them an email and waiting on their reply.
     
  7. Alpal

    Alpal Gold Member
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    Hi Poe Snow,, yeah I've done a few miles on my Scout, Bout 30,000 on my first one and about 7,000 miles on my second. Firstly, if you're 6ft 5inches, don't get a Scout, it would be a little cramped I feel if you went touring. That said of course I have read about tall guys who totally adore their Scouts so go figure. I'm 5ft 10 inches and weigh about 70 kgs fully suited up and ready to ride. The ride in a Scout as a commuter or just doing short runs is fine, it suits that riding very well. If you are planning on doing much longer rides then I would suggest you you consider taking steps to improve the suspension. If you are buying a preowned Scout then look to fitting a set of stronger springs in the front suspension and upgrading the rear shocks to improve that ride. Check it out first of course as someone may have upgraded the suspension already,..... The early Scout springs were tested and found to be suitable only for people weighing in at 36 to 50 kgs! This meant the bike would dive badly under braking and tended to wallow a lot in corners. If where you live has lots of winding hilly roads it can be quite tiring and not return a pleasant afternoon riding. The rear shocks have little adjustment and tended to bottom out both upwards and downwards.there is however a guy who has researched the Scout suspension situation and @DarkScout can solve these issues very easily and economically for you. If you are buying a new Scout then some of these issues may well be taken care of. A lot of Scout owners have said to me they don't have these issues and they may be right because it boils down to WHERE you ride. In the States it's usually a long straight ride to anywhere, but the hill country of New Zealand? Or Portugal? A different story.

    Seating on the Scout is quite good. I initially thought it was RS (rat shit) but after experimenting and spending lots of money I found that the seating was fine when coupled with a good set of Miniboards as opposed to pegs. They allow a lot more foot positions, thus easing the butt muscles somewhat. Seating position is King if you're out on a big trip. Fortunately Indjan come to the rescue here with three different seats and three different types of handlebars, all designed to improve the ride and the seating position. Reduced reach handlebars and seats REDUCE the distance between your butt and your hands on the grips. Standard reach is standard of course and extended reach bars and seats EXTEND the reach between grips and your butt, very useful for the TALL rider. I have back issues so need to be sitting with my back as close to 90* as possible to my legs and am in the process of getting the reduced reach bars and a set of 1.5 inch handlebar risers to achieve this.

    The Scout as a two up tourer? Not so sure that is a good thing. Room,....no room,.....the seating area for the pillion on a long trip would be ,......tight,......then there's luggage,.....if you're out for a week where are you going to put the gear? So, no, a touring two up bike it is not.

    What more can I say? If you have anything more specific let me know, I'm glad to help. But whether the Scout is the bike for you? you are the only one who can answer that my friend,.......
    Been fun, and you can always ask me more,.....
    Regards,
    Alpal
     
  8. Poe Snow

    Poe Snow New Member

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    Hey Alpal,
    Thanks for your thorough post and detailed experience. If you don't mind, I'd like to know why did you change Scout for Scout, if it was just a good deal that came up or if it was due to something else.

    I'm 5ft10in and weighting around 80kg and my lady is 5ft8in around 50kg, and I do plan on running us both through Portugal and Europe on my next motorcycle (whichever it is). I did view some reviews talking about the suspension (even Revzilla review talks about it, they also have some complains on how the turn signals move around and so on but I do think these issues aren't present on newer models) and yeah I'm ready to spend some money if suspension upgrades are necessary.

    I spend most of the year in Indonesia due to work, own a Honda Rebel 500 there and I could say that every review talks bad about suspension and how it's not good for touring with 2 people (pretty much the same thing you said about the Scout) but so far for us it's been good. When we go on it, we don't carry a lot of stuff, just essentials, and we also don't carry tent looking instead for cheap cozy places to spend the night. It would be very disappointing if the Scout, which is a bigger bike in all it's versions, wouldn't be able to do at least the same that my CMX500 does (even the saddle bags seem bigger on the Scout, except the Bobber ones).

    I've already sat on a Scout but it was just doing exposition in a watch shop for a brand, no riding, the seat and sitting position seemed really comfortable but the bars and the tank did feel a bit low (I don't really understand why they didn't do the fuel tank a tinny taller with more capacity but that's just my opinion). I'd love to see photos of your bar once you lift it up a bit, several guys in my Rebel club in Indonesia also raised their bars, some even use mini apes (and I think there's also that option for the Scout).

    Safe rides
     
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  9. Alpal

    Alpal Gold Member
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    Hi again Bud, yes, I'm on my second scout but not by choice, as June last year on my ride to work one dark morning I hit one of three stray horses out on the road just where I turn into work. The bike was written off and I'm slowly coming right with just a couple of operations to go to get back to "GO" as it were.

    Firstly my bike is a Scout, not a 60 not that it matters, they are essentially the same. Indicators? Yes, I have noticed that too but if they are really loose? I'd put some tape round the strut and all is good. Mine were loose but time has seemingly made them at least stay in the same position.

    Ok! Now I begin to see the picture of you and your girl, pretty much like Steph and I height and weight wise, and minimal junk carriers on trips too! This gets better! Two up on the Rebel? Then I would say, that the Scout will be a two up possibility for you both. With little luggage and you both adding up to about 130/140 kgs?, you will need those front springs and rear shocks done. When @DarkScout does suspension for people he obtains theirs weights and riding styles in order to have the bike fitted out to the riders,....so they are not some generic shock system,....they suit you. The difference is very, very noticeable. Also, and I always mention this, do both ends together or you make the ride worse,......look at it this way,......you need to update the suspension,....good, but you only do the rear shocks for some reason,....what have you done? You have made the problem worse because you have improved the rear but left the front the same,......this only widens the gap between the good rear and the poor front,.....do you see what I mean? Both must work together in order to achieve that better ride for you both.

    For me, as I've already mentioned, the seating position if you're going touring needs to be more upright in order to lessen the strain on your back,...( but you'd know about this,...) and as I said, mini boards go a long way to providing more comfort. Can't say what the ride is like on the rear because I've never been pillioned on a Scout! I will say that of those that have commented on the pillion position of the Scout in this and another forum, there was no bad comments that I know of.

    Once I get the risers and the reduced reach bars on I will get in touch with pics etc but it won't be for a while as the reduced reach bars are a gift from @Tombsmen in Canada and he's arranged for a Kiwi friend of his to bring them back to New Zeakand in January next year in his luggage.

    The petrol tank,.......most every one says , wow! It's too small! But while that may be true,
    I am getting 60 to 62 mpg from my "little" tank, the best I've done on a tank is 152 miles. By the time I've done 100 miles I'm thinking a stop would be nice,.....there is a guy in the States that does increase the size of your tank and does it well. The extra area is obtained under the tank so it looks no different to any other Scout tank. You may not get as far riding two up but how far do you travel before wanting to stop? That's the determining factor I feel,.....

    Just thought,....I think @SixShooter has pictures of his Scout with risers and standard bars and maybe some with the mini apes so Six Shooter? Come in. Six Shooter!? Can you help us out here Buddy?

    And lastly, I just checked out the CMX500. Not the bike I first thought it was,.....looks good Buddy,.....and yeah,....the Scout is much bigger!
    Regards,
    Alpal
     
    #9 Alpal, Aug 27, 2018
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2018
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  10. EPOCH6

    EPOCH6 Well-Known Member

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    Welcome aboard @Poe Snow.

    I can't give you any feedback regarding 2-up and/or luggage options as I have no experience with either but I can tell you that I've put 33,000 km on my 2018 Scout 60 with the stock suspension, seat, and handlebars in the last 7 months and haven't had a single mechanical issue beyond wear and tear. No quality control issues, no warranty work, no engine issues after removing the stock airbox, drilling the stock pipes, and running a custom fuel map. Nothing but oil changes, tires, and cosmetic repairs due to abusive riding. My stock brakes are still strong, it doesn't burn a drop of oil, it has never overheated, not a single bolt has rattled loose, and neither my engine nor radiator have sprung a leak (no additional aftermarket protection). My Scout is my only insured vehicle, I commute ~150 km a day on it rain or shine, I've toured 3000 - 5000 km on it 3 times this year (without a windshield or bags), and it is stored outside every night (in a tent when it rains or snows, BC is typically very humid and salty year round). I can say with 100% confidence that I trust the bike and that I would ride it across Canada tomorrow if I had the time off work.

    My Scout has lived a pretty hard life since January and it has yet to fail me once since the temperature rose above -3 C. So far that is the only quirk I've come across. Scouts are not great at cold starting when the temperature drops below 0 C. The general consensus is that this is the combined result of two factors, a small stock battery with a low CCA rating (cold cranking amps) and thick engine oil (~3.5 quarts of 15W-60). There is a little trick to improve cold starting performance (priming the fuel pump 5 times before your first attempt) and running an aftermarket fuel map (typically slightly rich as opposed to the stock map which is slightly lean) also improves cold starting performance.

    At around 25,000 km my rear wiring harness (just behind the tail light) began to show signs of insulation wear and started shorting out on the rear fender. This was very likely accelerated by frequent burnouts on gravel roads, I don't blame the bike. The ECU threw a code revealing the location of the short (as it should), I re-secured the existing wiring away from any edges with some zap straps, the code disappeared, and it has been fine since. I will take it to my dealer when it starts snowing to see if they'll replace the wiring under the manufacturer warranty, by then my bike should have close to 50,000 km.

    As for comfort, I'm not really the guy to ask. I'm 25, average fitness, 6 ft, and rode my Scout 60 from British Columbia to Utah and back in 7 days (~5000 km) with no windshield and the stock seat, pegs, and handlebars. I loved every minute of it and would do it again in a heartbeat. My father is 55, not very fit, has been working labor jobs his entire life, and followed me on his 2018 Scout 60 (bought it 2 weeks after trying mine for the first time) with no windshield and the stock seat, he also says he'd do it again in a heartbeat, stock parts and all. Most people think we're crazy, I don't blame them. Everybody has a different tolerance for discomfort.

    Keep us posted on your test drive experience. Personally, I'd recommend walking in there and telling them straight up that you'd like to book a test ride on a Scout 60. There's still enough riding season left that they'll probably offer you one on the spot.

    Anyway, good luck and cheers from BC!

    20180506_110020.jpg
     
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  11. Alpal

    Alpal Gold Member
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    Oh @EPOCH6 , you bring a cheer to my heart!,...listen to him good Poe Snow as we are two ends of the same stick in a sense. He is everything I am not on a Scout and he is vice verser. We both did a write up on the tuners we fitted to the Scout in order to give direction to anyone thinking of fitting one,......it was fun! I discover today how young and how tall Epoch is and Bang! He blows away some of my theory's. You will definitely gain the wide spectrum about Scouts from reading both our views, which are both driven by love of the bike topped off with a serving of honesty,.....but which ever way you flip Poe Snow, good luck and happy riding!
    Regards,
    Alpal
     
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  12. PileOParts

    PileOParts Silver Member

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    The same -- 2016 RM, closing in on 14,000, not a single problem other than a couple of preemptive recalls and the issue of towing damage caused by Canyon Dancer tie-downs.

    I live very close to brackish water and am amazed at the surface corrosion on two motorcycles that are sheltered in my carport and how my home air conditioner condenser fins deteriorate, all from salt in the atmosphere I can't even sense. The RM is stored inside the garage, isn't ridden in the rain deliberately, encounters no road salt or salty beach sand, but I don't see a single finish flaw. I'm frankly surprised by the video, which seems measured and thoughtful and well-supported with exhibits.

    The Wing is a more sophisticated motorcycle, but it's very much a two-wheeled car. Different strokes for different folks. There is a gamut in what pleases riders just as there is a gamut in machines from Wings to motocross. At this stage of my life, the RM suits me well and isn't eating me out of house and home like my BMW K1200LT (the industry's other two-wheeled car) was when I was riding it most of the time.
     
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  13. Poe Snow

    Poe Snow New Member

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    Sorry to hear about your accident. hope your recovery keeps going good and fast.

    Did you send your shocks to him or replaced with some aftermarket ones? I actually was planning to put Ohlins on my Rebel but ended up being comfortable with the stock shocks (go figure).

    For the seats I would probably go with Corbin or with some upholstering and gel pads from a local workshop. To be honest my lady is quite light so she usually doesn't have much issues with the pillions.

    I've already seen some mini apes, raised drag bars, etc., and liked it. That's definitely something I'll be looking at.

    The tank I'll have to see how it goes, I also don't plan to tour on highway and toll roads, so I'm sure I'll have lots of chances to refuel but it would be nice if I'd only need to refuel one time a day (not happening for sure on current tank). I might look into that fuel increase you said (if I do get the Indian) or even a custom fuel tank (wouldn't mind making a little taller).

    I'm really happy with the CMX500 there and it doesn't make sense to have a bigger bike there (roads don't allow you to go faster and the taxes are crazy high on high cc motorcyles).

    Thanks for all the information @Alpal . You'd been amazing.

    Thanks for sharing your experience @EPOCH6 , I read the post you made about the trip you did with your father - made me want to jump on a bike immediately and go touring, not sure I can get my old man into motorcycles although I'm sure I could convince him to tag along in his jeep.
    Glad to know your bike is holding great - all this positive feedback making me really looking forward for my test drive.


    Yeah that's really what surprised me about the video as well and if you watch his update video you'll get a feeling he's being brutally honest - maybe just bad luck on him getting the bad apple as said before.

    I'm really not looking into a Goldwing or similar models. I was looking for something in this style - I considered the Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster but my lady doesn't like it all (I find the bike beautiful but she's on the opposite side of the spectrum), the Yamaha Bolt and the Honda Shadow Phantom nut the Indian performance has me drowling (those dyno charts are amazing). I enjoy that naked bobber american-cruiser style and even looked at some HD but I really get a hard time accepting their price/performance ratio (I don't understand how their big engines are so weak compared to everyone else).

    Thanks for sharing your experience @PileOParts
     
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