USMC celebrate's 245 years

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by IROQUOIS, Nov 10, 2020.

  1. IROQUOIS

    IROQUOIS Gold Member

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    God Bless the UNITED STATE'S MARINES!
    Here's to another 245 years.
     
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  2. Baldhead_J

    Baldhead_J Gold Member
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    Thank you, gentlemen. Happy Birthday.
     
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  3. Baldhead_J

    Baldhead_J Gold Member
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    R.S.O. at the range I visited today is a Marine. I wished him a happy day. He assured me there was booze to be had after 1700.
     
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  4. Alpal

    Alpal Gold Member
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    So someone do tell of the Marines beginning in life,......love to hear it,.....how it all began
    Alpal
     
  5. Baldhead_J

    Baldhead_J Gold Member
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    Two guys in a bar...
     
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  6. Alpal

    Alpal Gold Member
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    No it didn't Baldhead,........
     
  7. JayFL459

    JayFL459 Silver Member
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    Assuming you are not joking they started as Naval Shipboard Security and assisted in Ship to Ship fighting and led the way in Landing for Battle .. Things that they still do today to a degree ..
     
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  8. Alpal

    Alpal Gold Member
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    Definitely don't joke about Marines,.....Thanks for telling,.....It triggered some memories of things I've read and yeah,......they started out as ship board soldiers,.....Thanks Bud,.....
    Alpal
     
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  9. Baldhead_J

    Baldhead_J Gold Member
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    That you haven't learned not to question me speaks ill of your character, sir.

    The supporting data follows, "The Marine Corps started as the Continental Marines during the American Revolutionary War, formed by a resolution of the Continental Congress on November 10, 1775, and first recruited at Tun Tavern in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They served as landing troops for the recently created Continental Navy."

    Hence, "Two guys in a bar." You're welcome.
     
  10. 2Cool

    2Cool Active Member

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    And the Marine Corps has matured over the years, since Nov 10, 1775, to become the most formidable fighting force in the world. Some have called us the "tip of the spear," from my experience we were more like an invincible giant sledgehammer that struck with lightning speed and accuracy leaving both devastation and chaos in our wake. My battalions motto is "Surrender or Die." 1/5 First Battalion 5th Marines.
     
  11. 2Cool

    2Cool Active Member

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    Another interesting fact sometimes asked regarding the Marine Corps;

    When have the United States Marines surrendered, and what were the circumstances?

    Since US involvement in WW1 in 1917, US Marine Combat Units have surrendered 3 times. These surrenders occurred on the islands of Guam, and Wake Island in December 1941, and Corregidor in May 1942. In all three cases, Marines were ordered to surrender by non-Marine officers who were in charge of the Marine units. On all 3 occasions prior to being forced to surrender, the Marines burned their colors before surrendering.

    On Guam, Marines were ordered to surrender on 10 Dec 1941 by US Navy Capt George McMillin who wore two hats, Governor and Military Commander on Guam.

    Marines on Wake Island were ordered to surrender on 23 Dec 1941 by US Navy Commander Winfield Cunningham who was the overall military commander on Wake.

    And Marines on Corregidor were ordered to surrender on 6 May 1942 by US Army General Jonathan Wainwright.

    In the various US Conflicts since Corregidor 6 May 1942, including Korea and Vietnam, no US Marine Combat Unit has surrendered! Even in those surrenders, the Marine unit’s colors were burned prior to surrendering, so we can say that in the history of the US Marine Corps, no Maine unit has lost its colors!

    Why Not?

    Quite simply it’s not in a US Marine’s DNA to surrender. This is because US Marines do not quit the fight unless they are ordered to do otherwise, US Marine Combat Units will/have fought to the last man!

    So Kudos to US Marine Maj General O.P. Smith in ordering and conducting a successful, and legendary, fighting withdrawal of US Marine forces at the Battle of the Chosin Reservoir in Dec 1950. Marine Corps Forces at the Frozen Chosin meant mostly the reinforced US 1st Marine Division consisting of over 30,000 men. (My regiment the 5th Marines that I served with in Vietnam is one of the regiments within the 1st Marine Division).

    The successful fighting withdrawal of US Marine Forces at the Chosin Battle resulted in the Chinese PVA (People’s Volunteer Army) being reduced to 18 combat infantry divisions from an Army that began with 30 combat infantry divisions totaling over 250, 000 men.

    The destruction of China’s PVA was so complete that China was unable to field Army infantry units until April 1951.

    All of this occurred because the vastly outnumbered US Marine Forces under Marine Maj General Smith’s command conducted a successful fighting withdrawal, instead of either surrendering or fighting to the last man. The fighting withdraw was so successful that it is studied to this day in military academies around the world.
     
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  12. Bubba58

    Bubba58 Bronze Member

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    Thanks 2Cool. I appreciate the history lesson. And I’m still glad that the Marine Corps is part of the Department of the Navy. We don’t mind delivering you fellas anywhere you need to go. ;).

    Bubba
    (Retired Sailor)
     
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  13. Alpal

    Alpal Gold Member
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    There is a memorial at MacKay's Crossing near Wellington to the US Marines who were based in two camps there during WW11,.....The camps were built, one on the flat and the other further up in the hills,.....New Zealand is truly grateful to these Marines as they, after completing training were shipped out to Guadalcanal. The 1st Marine Division made history landing there on August 7th 1942 and inflicting Japan's first defeat of its land army. ( They were ably assisted by other Marine Divisions which arrived later in the conflict. ) It was no no means an easy fight. Had the Marines not held their ground, New Zealand could quite well have been the next landing site for the Japanese Imperial Army.

    The memorial consists of a number of huts, sleeping quarters for the troops, perhaps two marines per hut. There is also another memorial to the 11 ( if I recall correctly ) marines and two navy personal drowned in a landing craft exercise off the coast near Waikanae.

    Being ex Army I occasionally call in to the Memorial to pay my respects. I was doing just that in 2015, travelling back home on my brand new 'First Run' Indian Scout. Whilst there a white limo pulled up and a number of people exited the vehicle. I did not pay much attention at first but on hearing an American accent curiosity compelled me to draw closer to the group. They were looking at a picture display of scenes both at the camp and also at Guadalcanal itself,.....a very elderly gentleman was looking hard at, as I found out later, a ship out from the landing area at Guadalcanal. I hung around and when one of the other men moved away from the group for a cigarette I approached and asked about the group and their connection with Mackay's Crossing Memorial. He told me his father had been in New Zealand Armed Forces and had made very close friends with a number of Marines and Navy personal during the time the Marines were at the camps. The elderly gentleman was one of those friends,......He was old and frail and wanted to visit one more time, the camp that had no doubt made such an impression on him in his younger days.

    I asked if he would introduce me to this ex serviceman which he did,.....He was still at the picture board, no doubt deep in memories, I expect both good and bad. I introduced my self to him, this frail old man with glistening eyes, I saluted him and thanked him for his service. He told me a little of his story, not a Marine, a sailor on either a troop ship or supply ship, I forget now,......He kept looking at the picture of the ship he thought was his,......He would become silent and I allowed him that, that journey back to the uncertain times for him and his mates,.....No, he was not a Marine but I still to this day feel so greatly honoured to have met that old sailor, who, no doubt did his share in that conflict,.....
    Alpal
     
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  14. 2Cool

    2Cool Active Member

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    Alpal, I didn't know much about NZ back in the day but I was told while in the MC that the Aussies still loved us Marines because of us stopping the Japs from invading. I arrived in Vietnam in the middle of January 1968 and decided to save my R&R to the end of my 13-month tour. I was supposed to go to Australia at the beginning of December 68 but the MC put on another large operation called Meade River, all R&R's were canceled. So instead of a week of fun, I think the MC tried to kill me.

    For the sake of another history lesson, the link below is from a Marine Corps veterans site with Marines from all era's talking to each other about the Meade River operation, some real stuff. The link starts on the 3rd page and has writings from a number of Marines that were at Meade River (I was in the 3/5 Marines). On this site, I'm "advanced" (Russ) and 2 Marines that helped save my life are Mongoose (Billy) and FistFull68 (Jack) both from the 3/26 Marines. Jack and I were both MC riflemen and Billy carried the M-60.


    Meade River 1968 - Page 3
     
    #14 2Cool, Nov 22, 2020 at 9:04 AM
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2020 at 9:11 AM
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  15. Alpal

    Alpal Gold Member
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    You are correct about the Aussies being grateful to the Marines also,.....They came a lot closer in invasion than New Zealand did,......Darwin was attacked by air and Sydney by midget submarine,....A close thing indeed. New Zealand lost ships in coastal waters but experienced no bombing.

    I haven't yet but I will check out Meade River 1968
    Alpal
     

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